Las Vegas shooting will inspire copycats


vegasTHE world can expect more attempts to shoot at crowds and it won’t just be music festivals that will be targeted, chilling prediction warns.

THE Las Vegas shooting massacre will inspire other copycat attacks and any crowded event is now a potential target, a chilling new prediction reveals.

Paddock opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival, killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 500 others in the deadliest mass shooting in recent US history.

Stewart warns that it isn’t just concertgoers at risk with sporting events, rallies and even everyday big crowds also being a potential target for a similar attack in future.

He also explains why he believes this wasn’t a one-off with 10 vehicular assaults committed by Jihadis since the Bastille Day attack last year.

“Success, and the heavy media coverage that accompanies it, clearly breeds imitation,” Stewart, a former special agent with the US State Department writes.

“Because of this, we can expect to see more attempts to shoot at crowds from elevated positions.

“The tactic does not pose a threat just to music festivals like the one in Las Vegas, but rather to any large crowd, whether gathered for parades, sporting events, rallies, protests or celebrations — or even at a tourist site.”

Authorities have revealed Paddock planned his attack meticulously, requesting an upper-floor room overlooking the festival, where he had stockpiled 23 guns, a dozen of them modified to fire continuously like an automatic weapon.Stewart goes on to write it was no surprise Paddock managed to kill so many people.

“Given his elevated position, unobstructed view of the crowd and large arsenal, it is not surprising that the attacker was able to inflict such mayhem, whatever his motive for doing so might have been,” he writes.

“Moreover, the bloodbath that followed provided a blueprint for other killers to follow, providing many important lessons for security professionals and ordinary citizens alike to heed.”

While acknowledging people can’t live their lives in fear, Stewart also points out security operations at such large events may need a rethink.